Monthly Archives: October 2016

Features Web Design

As a business owner, have you ever been totally clueless as to why your website isn’t converting? Do you feel like you have everything in place, yet your audience isn’t following through on your call to actions buttons, and your bounce rate is sky high? There could be a few crucial web design features that are missing on your website, and adding and adjusting them might mean the difference between success and failure.

Use this article as a ‘checklist’ to see whether your web design is on par, and which features you can implement to boost conversions and encourage engagement.

At the end of the day your audience will be attracted to modern design, elements they sub-consciously accept as the norm, because they’ve had that user-experience on other websites. Think of modern design as a combination of art, design, and functionality. When these elements ‘work’ in harmony your page will be undeniable and ultimately guide the visitor to where you want them to be.

So, ‘What’s Missing’?

 

1. Web Design That’s not Unique to Your Industry & Brand

Your web design is the first impression a visitor will have about the business. This page should not only be reflective of your industry, products or services, but it should stand out from competition and reflect your company culture. The Following should be considered:

  • Design should attract and imprint in the memory of your visitors to create “awareness”
  • Content should create a narrative to ‘tell your story’ through the website.

Make sure that your web design is unique and recognizable. Distinct visual approach & style, typography and interactive design elements play a big role in this department. All this creates the first impression in your visitor’s head and is crucial for the next interaction with your website.

Your content should engage. It shouldn’t be boring. A great way to incorporate additional interaction, to make your visitors stay connected is through the use of bold hero sections with enriched sliders, video content and content animations.

  • Hover Animations will make the website more intuitive and will give additional information regarding a feature function. Hovering over a feature or image will allow for instant visual feedback.
  • Large Scale Animations include effects like parallax scrolling and pop-up notifications.
  • Loading animations are used to keep a user engaged and are popular for one-page sites, flat design and minimalism.
  • Background animations and videos should be used in moderation but can add to the storytelling element of the page. It should be seen as an add-on and not a distraction.

A great example of this aspects is the creative WordPress theme TheGem recently released on Themeforest marketplace. This theme understands the need for individuality, creativity, awareness and interaction, offering many industry specific unique design concepts . When going through the demo pages of this theme you will see how different industry stories can be told in an attractive visual way, involving the user in interaction and remaining in his/her memory.

 

2. No Trending UX and UI Features

Even though your page visitor might not be able to pinpoint the exact reason why don’t find your website appealing, their subconscious will pick up that your page is sub-standard. Trending features within design can take a variety of forms, but for the last few years, these features are taking the front seat for UX and UI.

  • Scroll Jacking is where the user’s scrolling is directed to an exact vertical point on the screen, such as the top of the next content container. It’s replaced native scrolling and is more targeted. Here are some examples for that:
    1. Design for Your Satisfaction
    2. Lookbook
    3. Brilliance of Perfection

Designer guide for get Job

You can be the most creative and productive designer in the world, but it doesn’t mean anything without paid work. Designers can rely on repeat clients but it’s important to keep meeting new potential clients and building future relationships.

In this post I’d like to share tips and strategies for getting your work out there into the eyes of clients and other designers. There is no one best method to use, and in fact you should employ multiple strategies to garner the largest reach possible.

But make a game plan and learn why self-promotion is so important. Through practice it’ll become a lot easier like second nature.

 

It All Starts With A Portfolio

This should be obvious but I’m surprised how many designers have a weak portfolio of work, or even worse nothing at all.

Everyone uses the Internet and there’s no reason to believe this is slowing down.

If you do any digital work then you should have an online portfolio. This includes all creative jobs whether you’re an icon designer, web designer, digital artist, motion graphics designer, or anything similar. And this doesn’t mean that you need a custom website domain (although it’s a big help).

You can always delete old work and upload new work as your skills improve.

But just get yourself online and get your work up. This makes it so much easier to share your work whenever someone wants to see what you can do.

The worst situation is when you meet a new potential client that’s looking for a designer but you have nothing to show them. So if you don’t have anything up online that should be your first step.

The problem is that some designers have no work history, and therefore have nothing to put in a portfolios. In this case I recommend building practice projects and using them as work samples. These projects can demonstrate your skillset and also force you to keep practicing.

Trends For Modal Windows On The Web

Modal windows are those popup windows that appear over the screen rather than opening a new tab/window. They usually darken the background to bring attention to the popup.

Most websites running modal windows add some type of call to action whether it’s a button or a form or something. But it can also be a simple message about browser features like disabled JavaScript or an adblock extension.

Everything in the window takes precedence over the page so these modals are meant to draw attention. They can be annoying and outright infuriating but numbers don’t lie: they work.

Let’s delve a bit into current trends of modal windows to see how they work and why you’d use them.

 

Dark Backgrounds & Clickable Areas

Modal windows follow a similar design strategy and they’re not very complicated.

They mostly all use a darkened background on the page to bring attention to the modal content. This shouldn’t be a pitch black background because that can feel intimidating.

Instead the user should see a touch of the page behind the background, but it should have a reduced opacity. This could be 90% or 50% depending on how much you want to hide the page.

This isn’t universal but I hate when designers remove or ignore this feature. Yes there’s usually an X button or close button, however it takes more effort to move the mouse onto that button.

It should be possible to just click the background and hide the message right away.

Great Personal Online Portfolio

As a designer I think we’ve all experienced the difficulty of creating something personal, including a portfolio. You end up spending countless hours in Photoshop, trying a hundred different things and after two months you realize that your homepage still says “under construction.”

This might not be the case for everybody, but being my own client is quite challenge and that’s why I want to share how you can better set up a personal portfolio.

 

What’s the Purpose of Your Portfolio?

Before jumping in Photoshop and pumping out cool ideas, start with the core of your “business.” You are the client. Just as any other project you need to set goals first.

  • Do you want to sell products?
  • Simply showcase your products?
  • Get to know you?
  • Educate your audience?

These are just a couple of examples and you don’t necessarily have to pick one. A good idea might be to write down the goals you came up with and give them values. In my case that would be: Sell products (0/5), showcase products (2/5), get to know you (2/5), hire you (1/5).

This might seem strange, but the main purpose of my personal portfolio is not to hire me. In my case 90 percent of the inquiries I get are via Dribbble, so I decided to focus more on showcasing personal favorites.

 

Wireframing

Now that you’ve seen the examples, you probably want to start redesigning right away. That’s fine, but don’t open Photoshop yet. Grab pen and paper instead.

Set a time limit; let’s say one hour, and sketch out all the things that come to mind. Even when you think you’re done after 30 minutes, keep pushing. Nothing is “ugly” or “not done” in this stage. Aim for 20 completely different layouts.

After this brainstorm session, it’s time to filter sketches and come up with a wireframe. Since the choices are personal (obviously) I cannot give you a set of rules, but I have a few pointers:

  • Be clean and clear. It shouldn’t be that hard to explain what you’re doing. Make sure the first impression is clear and inviting.
  • Make choices. As a designer you’re probably pretty well-rounded. This doesn’t mean you need to highlight everything you did in the past. Highlight strengths rather than overall experience.
  • Focus on your products. Unless you really want to express your brand identity I think it’s best to keep your design minimal. It’s like an art gallery; you don’t want the showroom to get more attention than the actual artwork right?